American Samizdat

Sunday, March 31, 2002. *
There's nothing like first-hand reporting: Reports from Two Americans in Palestine Under Seige
posted by A.Q. at 9:19 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

One thing that's not really being reported on during this weekend's coverage of the escalating Israeli/Palestinian conflict is that Israel has occupied the Temple Mount. Sharon's visit to the Temple Mount (revered by Muslims because it is where Muhammad ascended to heaven and by Israelis because it is the location of the ruins of King Solomon's Temple) was one of the causes of the current Intifada. Some believe that when Temple of Solomon is rebuilt (and the Al-Aqsa mosque currently there is destroyed) the apocalypse will be triggered climaxing with the return of the messiah. According to Adam Parfrey's Extreme Islam Freemason's had tried to buy the mosque for 100 million in 1968 for this purpose. And that the red heifer (as prophesied by the Torah: "The Lord hath commanded saying: Speak unto the children of Israel that they bring thee a red heifer without spot, wherein is no blemish, and upon which never came yoke.") which is needed to purify the rebuilt Temple has already been born.
posted by New World at 3:24 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

it occured to me on my way home this Am...
that tomorrow is April 1,
and I think I'm going to be paying some substantial taxes this year.
Then after I put away the groceries and before I did the dishes,
I stopped by a few places, mostly sites of friends & comrades,
and this caught my attention, and I know, with absolute certainty,
I could not have put it any better.

posted by j at 8:59 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

James Thomas... Cuyahoga River on Fire (November 3, 1952). From Fires on the Cuyahoga River - part of The Cuyahoga River Online Exhibition at the Great Lakes Industrial History Center.
posted by Andrew at 8:37 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Saturday, March 30, 2002. *
some choice linky nuggets mined this evening...
seeking assistance in mitigating my ignorance;
first, The Murder of Arafat
from The Palestinian Chronicle;
this site new to me: Project Underground;
there we delighted in perusing
Greasing The Machine: Bush, His Cabinet and their Oil Connections;
the very interesting National Security Archive from G.W.U.;
where we came across this bit of history
Declassified Record of Ambassador Otto Juan Reich;
also like to point out this collection,
PBS Newshour Middle East Backround Reports
and, in some very interesting & serendipitous way,
the oldest link in that group, from 10.24.95: PLO Chairman Arafat
and this could come in very handy sometime,
U.S. Government Documents Foreign Policy Resources Search
more good stuff later...
posted by j at 9:46 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Friday, March 29, 2002. *
The War has Begun: News Update

Editor's Note: Following an Israeli security cabinet meeting today, Israel declared an 'extended war' on the Palestinians, a war that doesn't abide by 'geographic borders'. The war has in fact begun.[more]

Background / PM locks up Arafat, but what is his endgame?

Two decades after overseeing the eviction of Yasser Arafat from Beirut, Ariel Sharon came within a step Friday of exiling him from the West Bank, as the prime minister sent IDF troops smashing into the Palestinian Authority Chairman's compound in Ramallah, seizing the building in which his office is located, and literally confining him to a single floor.

"If Arafat wants to go to the bathroom," said one Israeli commentator, only half-joking, "he now needs Israeli permission."[more]
posted by Gordon at 6:02 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Stations of the Cross - an exhibition of 14 paintings by self-taught artist Chris Woods (January 11 - February 10, 1996). One of many brilliant collections of Works by Chris Woods at the Diane Farris Gallery in Vancouver, Canada.
posted by Andrew at 8:04 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Thursday, March 28, 2002. *
Nuke 'em into the Stone Age...
NOT a point of view you'll get from yourstruly,
(although I could end up feeling that way about Floridians,
no sorry, I should say "one particular Floridian...")
nor from Jon Carroll, again, saying what many of us think
this next item sorta in the vein of contemplating nuclear madness:
map a nuclear blast
posted by j at 10:24 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment



Maybe it's different in your community. Maybe where you live there's a diverse array of radio stations, each with distinctive programming visions, run by people motivated by nothing but their love of music and the possibilities of the medium.

But in my city we have three or four cookie-cutter formats for dozens of mindless stations clogging up the airwaves... which interestingly enough tend to be owned by a handful of broadcast conglomerates, the same corporate leviathans that also have concert promotion and the record industry in their synergetic clutches.

Wherever I go in North America, it's as if these radio stations follow me. I mean, they're identical. The same narrow, repetitive and dreary playlists, the same idiotic (not to mention jingoistic and sexist) DJ patter. A dime-store Marxist wanting to demonstrate that capitalist hegemony leads to a sterile cultural wasteland need only turn a couple dials...

As any online listener knows, it's hard to overstate what an improvement internet radio represents. We all have our favorites (mine is WFMU) that provide us with the alternative sounds and voices that barely exist on the airwaves. But the real miracle that these stations perform is to allow passionate programmers to elevate the form into an art -- usually on a shoestring, often commercial-free. The technology has scaled down to the point that world-wide reach is available to anyone. It's one of those rare cases where the utopian promise of the net is close to being realized.

Simply put... THIS is the golden age of radio.

And it's about to end. The same corporate weasels who ruined broadcast radio are determined to work their magic on the net. They've got their lapdogs in government ready to do their bidding.

One report suggests that stations currently paying about $1000 per year in royalties could see that rate jump to $1000 per day. Another article quotes an executive predicting "the Webcasting landscape will be a moonscape in six months.''


Save Internet Radio
posted by Mr. GluSniffer at 10:16 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

there's this fool on the east coast...
in Florida, to be a little more precise,
who posted the following at his weblogthingie this AM:
Those handwringers and EU-nuchs who oppose American action against Iraq are latter-day Neville Chamberlains, wanting to use diplomacy to get a piece of paper that would guarantee "peace in our time." Well, there is NO paper, no treaty, that guarantees peace. If you want a guarantee of peace, look to your arsenal. If you want peace, prepare for war. Nations (and terrorists) attack other nations that appear to be weak. The 9/11 terrorists thought that we were weak and degenerate; their compatriots have learned to their chagrin that we are not.

so, oncet upon a time, this, ahhhhhh, (well, let's be charitable) moron
got under my skin in a big way, maybe I'll link to the exchange we
had w/him later, but for now, isn't that kind of thinking what we should
be avoiding. Isn't that just the same old shit all over again? It fills me
with dread and dismay to come across this mindset, again and again,
& to contemplate that it is a majority opinion, well, personally, I find it
heartbreaking. Anyone want the link to this fellow's site, Email Me
posted by j at 8:48 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Russian Prison Tattoos. "...It is not known when tattooing first became a common practice in Russian prisons and Stalinist Gulags. Soviet researchers first discovered and studied this underground activity in the 1920s; photographs of prisoners from that period suggest an already elaborate and highly developed subculture. More than simple decoration, the images symbolically proclaim the wearer's background and rank within the complex social system of the jailed."
posted by Andrew at 6:57 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Wednesday, March 27, 2002. *
Letter From Israel
Against Negotiations
by Ran HaCohen

"Negotiations", "peace talks", "Peace Process" and the like are nothing but Newspeak which literally means "occupation goes on; meanwhile, let's have a chat." For seven long years (1993-2000), Israel was holding "peace talks" with the Palestinians. At the outset, both Palestinians and Israeli citizens thought the "talks" were about ending the occupation. In fact, during all those years, not a single settlement was dismantled, but dozens of new ones were established. Not a single settler was evacuated: actually, their number was doubled. That's what "negotiations" mean. The Palestinians cannot be expected to stop the Intifada for this trap they know so well.

The whole concept of "political negotiations" between Israel and the Palestinians is absurd. What "negotiations" can there be between occupier and occupied, between jailer and prisoner? Either the jailer wants to set the prisoner free, or he does not. In both cases, there is no room for "negotiations".
[more]
posted by Gordon at 11:18 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

American Electronic Journalism at it's Best...

even el residente looks askance

CNN: Now hiring California High School Graduates.
good nite, Uncle Miltie...

posted by j at 10:29 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

if you're going to be a sheep, be a black sheep
Mark's back from New Mexico, & we couldn't resist the
opportunity to share link provided via his wood s lot
and thanks to Al J. for digging up that N.Y.'er link
posted by j at 2:44 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

The Great Terror
Across the city, other families were making similar decisions. Nouri Hama Ali, who lived in the northern part of town, decided to lead his family in the direction of Anab, a collective settlement on the outskirts of Halabja that housed Kurds displaced when the Iraqi Army destroyed their villages. "On the road to Anab, many of the women and children began to die," Nouri told me. "The chemical clouds were on the ground. They were heavy. We could see them." People were dying all around, he said. When a child could not go on, the parents, becoming hysterical with fear, abandoned him. "Many children were left on the ground, by the side of the road. Old people as well. They were running, then they would stop breathing and die."

Nasreen's family did not move quickly. "We wanted to wash ourselves off and find water to drink," she said. "We wanted to wash the faces of the children who were vomiting. The children were crying for water. There was powder on the ground, white. We couldn't decide whether to drink the water or not, but some people drank the water from the well they were so thirsty."

They ran in a panic through the city, Nasreen recalled, in the direction of Anab. The bombardment continued intermittently, Air Force planes circling overhead. "People were showing different symptoms. One person touched some of the powder, and her skin started bubbling."
posted by A.Q. at 1:58 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

first off, let me say I'm proud to be a contributor here
so Gracias, Dr. M., for the invitation to be included.
now:
L.A. Times editorial re Bush's Arctic Obsession
& now, for something completely different:
(albeit also from the LAT)
"the most underappreciated comedian of all"
posted by j at 11:42 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

American Terrorism is American Tradition
The greatest acts of terrorism are not committed by furtive gangs of masked desperados in foreign lands. The most horrific acts of terrorism in world history have always been committed by governments and their militaries.

The government and military of the United States of America have committed massive acts of international terrorism and brutal genocide -- throughout the 20th century.

Official FBI definition of terrorism:

"Terrorism is the unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives."

By its own definition the hypocrite U.S. government is guilty of terrorism -- on a massive, international scale. And for over 100 years!

The U.S. government has broken international law and the Geneva Convention many times with its brutal use of force and horrific violence against persons and property, to intimidate and coerce governments, civilian populations, and many segments thereof, in furtherance of political, social and especially economic objectives.
[read more]
posted by Craig at 9:39 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

We Die Alone. "...a series of collages pasted together inside one of the most depressing books in the english speaking world." From Bad Taco.
posted by Andrew at 8:50 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Tuesday, March 26, 2002. *
The International Solidarity Movement is a group of international students, activists, and regular people who are taking part in non-violent demonstrations in Palestine. The group consists of Americans (Jewish, Muslim, and Christians) and representatives from several other countries. So far they have stopped tanks, removed roadblocks and even suspended the operation of one checkpoint, all by nonviolent means. They have the support of both the Israeli and Palestinian peace movements, and need all the help they can get. Check out their site and write your local newspaper or television station to do a story on people laying down their lives in non-violent protest.
posted by A.Q. at 4:16 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

NSA possibly has broken most PGP keys. Lucky Green:
a 1024-bit RSA factoring device can likely be built using only commercially available technology for a price range of several hundred million dollars to about 1 billion dollars. Costs may well drop lower if one has the use of a chip fab. It is a matter of public record that the NSA as well as the Chinese, Russian, French, and many other intelligence agencies alloperate their own fabs.

Some may consider a price tag potentially reaching $1B prohibitive. One should keep in mind that the NRO regularly launches SIGINT satellites costing close to $2B each. Would the NSA have built a device at less than half the cost of one of their satellites to be able to decipher the interception data obtained via many such satellites? The NSA would have to be derelict of duty to not have done so.(...)

In light of the above, I reluctantly revoked all my personal 1024-bit PGP keys and the large web-of-trust that these keys have acquired over time.

posted by jerry at 8:00 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Citizens in Action
from the New Yorker of 3.25:
Reba from Ocean Parkway;
the Basho of Honk;
small steps, folks, and the courage to make them...
posted by j at 7:19 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Remember the pain, heal the wounds

Given the current carnage in the Middle East, it may seem arbitrary - perverse, even - to alight on one bloody episode from 54 years ago. But the events that took place in the Palestinian village of Deir Yassin in April 1948 are so symbolic that they might almost serve as the DNA of the Arab-Israeli conflict. And the decision to memorialise them in England, Scotland, and elsewhere around the world on April 7 is highly charged and, to some, downright inflammatory.

The bare facts are beyond dispute. Early in the morning of April 9 1948, commandos of the Irgun (headed by Menachem Begin) and Lehi guerrilla groups, with the help of a small elite unit from the main Jewish defence organisation, the Haganah, led an attack on the Arab village of Deir Yassin, west of Jerusalem. Some 100 Palestinians (mainly old men, women and children) were killed.
[more]
posted by Gordon at 12:35 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Monday, March 25, 2002. *
Normon Solomon: "The Liberal Media" -- A Poltergeist That Will Not Die

See also via FAIR: Fear & Favor 2001: How Power Shapes the News.

" . . . incidents of outright censorship occurred, and even more self-censorship, as many outlets confused independent inquiry with a lack of patriotism.

"At the same time, there was no let-up in pressure from the more usual sources: media owners and advertisers. Corporate media owners increasingly see using their media outlets to promote their other businesses and the perspectives they favor as simply standard business practice; and advertisers, in a time of recession, appear to feel freer than ever to demand a favorable context for their ads, which are, after all, media’s main revenue source. Further consolidation in the industry, abetted and encouraged by a deregulatory FCC, only promises more to come." [more]

posted by Dr. Menlo at 8:49 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

When Star Trek Was New: Rare William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy Interviews from 1966. "...It's this timing that makes the interviews so fascinating: both Shatner and Nimoy are talking about a show that the public had yet to see. There is the sound of uncertainty in Shatner's voice - he's hoping Star Trek will be a success and that it will be exciting. He is not talking about what the show was about, as has been the case for the past 35 years."
posted by Andrew at 7:08 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Sunday, March 24, 2002. *
unions
Rome.The Berlusconi government has irritated alot of people for alot of reasons. One reason being their efforts to modify Articolo 18, a Worker’s Rights article which protects employees from being fired without a justifiable cause. Obviously workers and unions are in an uproar. So Sergio Cofferati, general secretary of CGIL, the largest union in Italy, declared a National Day of Protest. A few days before the scheduled manifestation, Marco Biagi, economist and collaborator of the labour minister working against Articolo 18, was murdered in front of his home one evening coming home from work. The Brigate Rosse (Red Brigade) are presumably responsible for his death. Some members of the Berlusconi government then insinuated that Biagi’s death was due, in part, to Cofferati who, in his efforts to organize such a large protest had triggered off a kind of Bad Karma provoking feelings of hostility. And this hostility resulted with the reanimation of the Brigate Rosse and thus Biagi’s death. As if dissent were a gun. With this accusation the government probably had hoped for the cancellation of the manifestation. Instead, hundreds of thousands (some estimate even 3 million) people showed up in Rome this past Saturday to protest not only against the Berlusconi government but to protest against terrorism as well. In other words, to defend democracy. It was A Family Affair....couples walking hand in hand, fathers carrying kids, grandparents wearing tennis shoes peacefully walked the streets of Rome in protest. Many wore signs like: TU SI TU NO NO CI STO while others carried red CGIL flags. There were so many of these flags that the streets looked like A Red River Flow.The protesters walked to Circo Massimo where Cofferati gave his speech. It was A Beautiful Day and many sat on the grass, took out sandwiches from their knapsacks and ate while the crowd near Cofferati periodically cheered. Protest and Picnic. I was happy to be there.
she was happy to be there
he touched her with his flag

posted by cynthia korzekwa at 11:43 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

yah, ok, it may seem like we tootin' our own horn...
but in order to avoid filling up this place w/my own ramblin' ways,
we'll instead point you to what was on our mind this weekend;
your feedback & commentary appreciated

posted by j at 6:09 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Self improvement:
Emergency medical supplies: your head gets cut off. The pack (spread throughout your skull) stabilizes your brain. Or you get massive bleeding: it shuts down blood supply to that area temporarily, improves clotting, and grows a bandage over the wound.
Wings: most useful in low-gravity habitats, or when skydiving.
Controllable fingertip suction cups (for picking up paper stuck to the desk).
posted by riley dog at 2:32 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Nhon Nguyen... Bus Stop Series Two (Route 7, Seattle Metro). "...I first started out putting my work on buildings along Route 7. The pieces didn't stay up for very long, people would snag them up after a few hours or so. A lot of the pieces went down with the buildings in downtown as they were demolished for reconstruction. I then started noticing these new bus stops that were being constructed all over the place. I then started throwing up my pieces on these bus stops. I was restricted to only one size and format for these bus stops but that just made my design more challenging." From Route 7 Gallery. Public art, installations, and paintings on canvas by Nhon Nguyen, a.k.a. Nhon9.
posted by Andrew at 7:20 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Saturday, March 23, 2002. *
AllenGinsberg.org

Welcome to AllenGinsberg.org where you can explore published as well as never-before-published text, photos, hand-written documents and audio and video materials representing Allen's life-work.

The material available here — and that which we will be adding over time — is intended to continually reveal the intelligence and beauty of Allen Ginsberg's aim of increasing consciousness on the planet.

I came upon this site via Nick Davies at MorfaBlog, a Welsh site, who had linked to the wonderful poem Wales Visitation. It's but one of a number of Allen's poems available in MP3 format.

Wales Visitation

Allen's Notes
"Wales Visitation" was written on the 6th hour or so hour of an acid trip in Wales at the house of my English publisher. The word "visitation" comes from the peregrinations of the Welsh bards, who went once from village to village rhyming their news and gossip. The poem uses two thirds of the notes made at that time, stitched together later. I was interested in making an artwork comprehensible to people not high on acid, an artifact which could point others' attention to microscopic details of the scene. They wouldn't necessarily know the poem was written on acid, but with an extraordinarily magnified visionary appreciation of the vastness of the motif in its "minute particulars," it might transfer the high consciousness of LSD to somebody with ordinary mind. By focusing the poem's eye outside of my thoughts onto external pictures details of the phenomenal world I was able to maintain a center and balance, continuing from beginning to end in an intelligible sequence, focusing on awareness of breath. It was coherent enough to publish in "The New Yorker", whose editors eliminated the note about acid.
posted by Gordon at 3:18 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

that welcome from george bush creeps me out...
FirstGov -- Your First Click to the US Government
nugget of linky goodness provided via shikencho
posted by j at 2:50 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Life as a Black Man: The Game
posted by Dr. Menlo at 12:22 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

posted by Dr. Menlo at 12:12 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

"The Remains of Industry..." John Fekner... Industria. Early stencil graffiti by John Fekner. "...The outdoor stencils were spraypainted in the New York City area. 1976-1985."
posted by Andrew at 6:40 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

"Suffering under a Great Injustice": Ansel Adams's Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar
posted by Mark at 6:40 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Friday, March 22, 2002. *
Friendly reminder: "If you're not reading Unknown News, you're letting the terrorists win."
posted by Dr. Menlo at 6:14 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

HEY!
dammit, this sucks too!
and somebody please, Stop this guy,
put a leash AND muzzle on him...
posted by j at 7:06 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Thursday, March 21, 2002. *
j.p.'s link to Fiore reminds me of Jon Carroll's comments on the color code scheme:
What problem is being solved by this new color system? Tom Ridge is so very important that he has refused to appear before Congress to answer questions (part of the administration's policy of putting its fingers in its ears, facing toward Capitol Hill and saying, "I can't hear you! "). ...Finally he appears at a news conference with a chart that looks like a kindergarten teaching aid. "This provides a common vocabulary so officials from all levels of government can communicate easily," he said. ... So everyone agrees that we have a yellow. Does everyone agree on what "having a yellow" means?
posted by brooke at 6:29 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Re: Color Coded Alert Systems
here are the Executive Branch Alerts
by Mark Fiore, S.F. Chronicle
posted by j at 2:25 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Attack of the Chickenhawks

Over the last couple of days I have noticed an explosion of web interest in the mysterious phenomenon of known physical cowards in high places who somehow find a blustery bravery while crouching behind the teenage sons and daughters of others. I'm of course referring to our draft-dodging Republican leadership. I am routinely (as in every election cycle and every military action) amazed that this scandal doesn't cause the right wing at the least to be exiled from power, if not to die in a spectacular implosion from the weight of their own contradictions. However this issue is finally getting more attention than just beery me haranguing my war loving friends about the hypocrisy of the current regime. And the present examination is demonstrating that these aren't a couple of isolated instances, rather these cases betray an epidemic pathological narcissism in the once and future ruling class.

Hall of Shame

Another list of traitors

Yet another compendium of cowards

An insane Tom Delay's excuse:
So many minority youths had volunteered for the well-paying military positions to escape poverty and the ghetto that there was literally no room for patriotic folks like himself.
Tom Tomorrow asks:
I'd be curious to get some feedback on this from those of you in uniform. Are the men and women you serve with in any way troubled by this-- that so many of the politicians who are so eager to send you into harm's way did everything possible to avoid risking their own lives during the conflicts of their youth?
Well, I myself never served (too young for Vietnam, too old for everything else, whew) but my father spent most of his life in the Army. He was the one who alerted me to this problem during the reign of Bush I, specifically citing then Secretary of Defense Cheney as uniquely unqualified for his position and noting his comment that he "had other priorities" was particularly offensive. Many of those who were drafted surely had things on their to-do list ahead of "miserable jungle death". My dad was also incensed at a comment by Newt Gingrich that since he had two small children, it would have been "insane" for him to go to Vietnam. My dad had two small children and a pregnant wife at that time. And he volunteered. For combat. Twice. Dad's problem with this issue wasn't personal though, he was a career officer who had made a choice to be where he was. His problem was with the children of elites finding easy routes out of harm's way, while the poor and politically disenfranchised were being shot at daily in a struggle of dubious import to the security of the nation. He knew this contributed in no small measure to the legitimate opposition to the war on the homefront and a thouroughly demoralized corps on the real front. In his eyes, the galling ethical duality of people like Cheney, Bush, Quayle, Gingrich et. al. is staggering. They putatively supported the Vietnam war, and now seize every martial opportunity that comes their way, rendering their own combat avoidance pure cowardice and hubris. My dad would contrast these men with the political opponents of the war, many of whom were imprisoned, whose refusals to serve were acts of conscience and yes courage. Of course, this is all anecdotal narrative of one admittedly maverick soldier and doesn't demonstrate any breadth of resentment in the armed forces and hardly answers Tom's question. But I can't help but think that if this scandal was given the relentless media blitzkrieg that Oval Office blow jobs received then the American people would come to realize how truly unfit is the present leadership of this nation.

posted by jerry at 10:59 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Max Razdow... Fed to the Lizard by the Hand of Man (2001, ink and pen on paper). "...There is a beast on the horizon of our landscape here, some sort of creature (Lizard)... it devours you and you are gone... who's beast is it? no ones, i think. Just a mean mean dragon that is green with our greed and exists deep in our hearts. The feeder is capitalists, treaded and hooded; white sheeted. Lizard has no trouble engulfing you in his mouth, the beast built on money and our greed, but is strong with the gold of our ages, embeded in our genes, always on the horizon... The keeper is not absolute. He loves the Lizard, though, it is his duty and art to feed it...and feeding it makes him stronger." From Max Razdow Ahrt.
posted by Andrew at 8:21 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Wednesday, March 20, 2002. *
Here is an update on the film 'Promises' that is nominated for the Academy Award and has been previously mentioned on this site and others.
CBS News | Broken Promises | March 20, 2002 22:09:23
posted by A.Q. at 11:49 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Long, thoughtful, must-read reflection on the growing love affair the media have with weblogging, from Turbulent Velvet. As stories about weblogging become more prevalent, he observes, "People are using a small subset of urbane and civilized weblogs in order to draw conclusions about both the medium and the sociology of blogging without acknowledging some far more ugly developments," by which he means the attack blogs and in particular the warblogs. While I'd like to be complacent in the distinctions, as I read I became more and more disquieted by how much the things for which the warblogs are vilified in my circles also apply to the antiwarblogs of my circles:

"The right's attack blogs are really a very efficient chain of routers, repeaters essentially, multiplying punditry about punditry. I can't think of one that is adding to the sum of human knowledge." Bingo. And not only that: there are as many if not more attack blogs out there as urbane dialogic, thoughtful ones. "What worries me is that the cumulative effect [of attack blogs] actually diminishes the value of news...as they drive the fact/opinion ratio down through the floor."


I'm not sure if TV is troubled by this when he attempts to pull the following rabbit out of the hat -- that it's more courageous to blog in dissent against the prevailing norms, like support for the War-on-Terrorism®, than in lockstep support. As a fervent dissenter, I'd like to think I'm taking a courageous stand, but it worries me how easy this is when I'm preaching to the converted. If you don't like my cynical critique of everything under the sun, I know you won't be reading FmH regularly for long no matter if I'm the most thoughtful, literate weblogger on the planet. There's very little crosstalk; I'm disappointed that the warbloggers haven't found me to get under their skins enough to fire back, with the exception of Dan Hartung, an early supporter and friend in the weblogging community, and even that dialogue didn't last long. In this sense, the weblogging community is not at all seeming like the digital speakers' corner in a pluralistic society it is sometimes made out to be. More often, it is seeming like a sad reminder of our atomization and solipsism. So what do I want? to find comfort in a likeminded community? to have influence if I'm ever, for a moment, thoughtful and original enough that I can transcend the usual sanctimoniousness of my dissenting views? to provoke a fight and unleash a reservoir of rage? to transcend the mere passive whining and help build a vigorous opposition again in this nation of sheep? I think so, at least a little, in each instance.



When I started this, long ago in a galaxy far away (everyone says that 9-11 was a demarcation line, but for me it was only one of twin 'hits', along with the theft of the Presidential election the year before, that have moved me -- us -- into an irrevocably changed alien world) I was in a relatively apolitical period in my life and FmH had a meandering, more eclectic flavor. I said here, with superior disdain, that I couldn't be bothered to spend much attention on the Presidential campaign, that there couldn't be much of a difference no matter which of the Republicrats bought the Office. Now I think at times FmH's focus has become a bit too narrowly, obsessively, built around political criticism, not that I've had some kind of religious conversion to membership in the Liberal Democratic Church or anything, but just because Bush is so unbelievably bad, such an execrable figurehead for what is so wrong with American politics and modern life.



That being said, I hope what I write here is more than just easy cheap shots. But I also hope to get a bit away from this groove, if I can let go. Who was it who said, surveying the impact of the Shrub hegemony even before 9-11, that the only sane response was to resurrect beatnik counterculture again? It seems even more relevant as we seem to be slipping into this Orwellian age of permanent amorphous war footing and increasing autocratic intrusion. Yet these are not new phenomena. While what we're subjected to now is unprecedented, it is new in magnitude rather than in kind, it seems, an opportunist perfection of age-old tendencies toward mind-control and autocratic rule by whatever memes are handy. A deeper, more fundamental critique of consensus reality, a critique of the cultural trance, the perennial human susceptibility to self-delusion, alienation and submissiveness, is called for. That's what 'Beat' must mean. That's a community to get behind. Although it might be worthwhile postponing a retreat from politics until we have organized massive resistance to the momentum to attack Iraq... In any case, thanks, Velvet, for allowing me to riff off your thoughts; it's been a useful reflection, if it means anything at all. (I'm sure the warbloggers would think it doesn't...)



"I refuse to be intimidated by reality anymore. After all, what is reality anyway? Nothin' but a collective hunch." --Lily Tomlin (parenthetically, there's an appreciation of the much-beloved Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe over at the bitter shack; and a happy birthday, Brooke!)


posted by emg at 10:52 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

it appears that Campaign Finance Reform is becoming a reality...
yet there are likely to be some ugly and unpleasant surprises waiting for us.
Mark Sandalow of the S.F. Chronicle reports on some discomfiting aspects of the bill;
some info on H.R. 2356 from www.senate.gov.
anything that might give el residente an edge in 2004 scares the bejezzzus outta me...
and, oh yah, like this is really news...
posted by j at 4:25 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

"Avistamiento de propaganda Acamonchi en tu comunidad..." Propaganda Stenciles from Acamonchi Fanzine.
posted by Andrew at 8:57 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

From Salon's interview with David Halliday, former head of the U.N.'s oil for food program:



In the U.S., there are a number of issues not being discussed. One of those is international law. The U.S. somehow doesn't believe that international law applies to this great democracy, to this great empire. We've seen Mr. Bush reject various aspects of international law in the past year. That's a failure on the part of Washington to understand that the U.S. is in fact subordinate to the charter, to the declaration of human rights, to the Geneva Conventions and protocols -- all of which would protect Iraq, a sovereign state and member of the United Nations -- from further harassment, attacks and killings by the United States.

[What's missing is] respect for international law and an awareness that this is not an empire -- that "might" is no longer "right" in the year 2002, and that Mr. Bush does not have any God-given right to attack Iraq or its people without consultation with the Security Council. There is no legitimate way for the U.S. to wage war again on the people of Iraq. That's one huge issue that's missing, in my view.

Another would be the fact that American foreign policy is not understood by the vast majority of American people. And that this is due to a media that in this country is suppressed by Washington and by the owners of this media, who often tend to be corporate entities close to the [White House] and very often are arms manufacturers with a vested interest in chaos [in] the Middle East. And as a result Americans do not actually get both sides of the story.

I believe that Americans are basically decent people. If they understood that Iraq is not made up of 22 million Saddam Husseins but made up of 22 million people -- of families, of children, of elderly parents, families with dreams and hopes and expectations for their children and themselves -- they would be horrified to realize that the current killing of innocent Iraqi civilians by the U.S. Air Force, or what happened in the Gulf War, is being done in their name.



This is my first post here -- hi all, and thanks to Dr Menlo for the invitation.
posted by lia at 12:27 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Tuesday, March 19, 2002. *

Women I Love: Frances Moore Lappé
Solutions for a Small Planet on the Brink

Did your parents raise you on a steady diet of tofu, soymilk and unsweetened granola?

If so, you probably have Frances Moore Lappé to blame. Her seminal 1971 book Diet for a Small Planet was a bible for millions of baby boomers who wanted to eat better. For many, Diet was also a political and personal manifesto, the first book to detail how you don’t need meat to get enough protein, and more importantly, how there is more than enough food in the world to go around.

Hunger, Lappé found, is caused by a scarcity of democracy, not food.

posted by Dr. Menlo at 11:06 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

America's bioterror
Bush has pledged to eliminate weapons of mass destruction. He should start at home

So those of us in other nations who have followed this issue are puzzled. Why should you, who claim to want to build "a peaceful world beyond the war on terror" have done all you can to undermine efforts to control these deadly weapons? Why should the congressmen in your party have repeatedly sabotaged attempts to ensure that biological and chemical agents are eliminated?
[more]
posted by Gordon at 9:59 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Nicaraguan Murals 1930-2000. From the Stanford Center for Latin-American Studies.
posted by Andrew at 8:17 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Women Speak Out Against Indian Bill on Domestic Violence

"A draft law to prevent domestic violence in India has sparked fierce opposition among rights groups and in legal circles over a clause which would open the way for husbands to occasionally beat their wives."

posted by Dr. Menlo at 1:43 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Monday, March 18, 2002. *
See the danger
Always danger
Endless talking
Life rebuilding
Don't walk away...

Joy Division... Atmosphere (Factory Records 1980, .mp3 audio 1.6MB). This is the first Joy Division single I owned, roughly 20 years ago. Exceptionally gloomy. From Joy Division - The Eternal.
posted by Andrew at 5:26 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment



U.N. SETS "GLOBAL MARCH MADNESS" FIELD
Selection Committee Gives U.S., China No. 1 seeds; Iraq a No. 3 in Mideast

"March Madness," the sobriquet of America's NCAA college basketball tournament, has spilled over to the international arena, as the United Nations Selection Committee today named the top 63 countries who will quite literally battle it out in a single elimination, military competition that should answer once and for all who is No. 1.

The tournament, which U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan promised would be "just like the NCAA's, except for the part where the losers die," has already sparked controversy among peace activists, who called the contests outrageous.

"I cannot believe they would do this," said WorldPeaceNow communications director Marvin Gundersohn. "I mean, come on, France is a 2-seed in the South? That's a laugh. And no way does Russia deserve a top seed in the Mideast. They're mired in a late 20th Century slump, have no momentum coming in, and have fought a weak schedule."[more]
posted by Gordon at 3:06 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Sunday, March 17, 2002. *
Isidoro Ocampo... El Fascismo Japones (Fascism in Japan, poster 1938). One of the First anti-fascist posters by TGP. Part of Taller de Gráfica Popular (La Estampa Mexicana, 1949). "...a selection of text and images from this 1949 bi-lingual record of the first 12 years of an exceptional graphic workshop, operating as a cooperative."
posted by Andrew at 8:10 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Saturday, March 16, 2002. *


Remember the East Asia crisis? when the US Treasury and its IMF allies blamed that region's problems on crony capitalism, lack of transparency, and poor corporate governance? Countries were told to follow the American model, use American auditing firms, bring in American entrepreneurs to teach them how to run their companies. (Never mind that under the leadership of their own entrepreneurs East Asia grew faster than any other region - and with greater stability - over the previous three decades.) The unfolding Enron scandal brings new meaning to two favorite American sayings: ``What goes around comes around,'' and ``People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.''

Crony Capitalism American Style
posted by Fred at 6:27 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Alas. I seem to have caused many to get indignant. Sorry about that. A quick note (since there is no spot where views might be exchanged at this site).
1. I am aware of the camps and how bad they are. Question: how did the camps come into existence? Who had the land that is now under Israeli control? Why did the two nations (the only two) make peace with Israel but did not want this land back?
2. A book written by someone years ago from the camps is simply that: a book written years ago about the camps. In fact, you no longer see kids tossing stones but bearing automatic weapons...how did they manage to turn stones into authomatics?
3. I do get a bit annoyed when told I am this or that when in fact not that much is known about me. I have been in a war zone and know what goes on that is not what is or should be "proper." I challenge virtually anyone to imply that they read more Arab sites on a daily basis than I do. In fact I have even had an e-mail exchanges with one of the leading Arab terror groups at their website. I read more Arab sites than I do Israeli ones!
4. I knew years ago that Israel was becoming a garrison state because of the many attempts to eradicate it; America is heading now in this direction.
5. I believe and have identified with Palestinians, Chrisitians, and American Jews to get Israel out of the occupied territories--but on condition that a peace accord between contending parties is signed. Who gives back land taken in war without first having a peace accord?
6. How many of my detractors have examined the public school texts used in the territories under PLO control? Try it.
7. The US is "even" willing now to reocgnize a Palestinian state? This is because we want (it won't happen) Arab support for an attack against Iraq and are sucking up to get their friendship. The Palestinians were offered statehood in 1947 by a huge vote of support in the UN. It was turned it down. The Rightwing in Israel might oppose a Palestinian state but the center and today';s just issued poll reveals that over 60% of Israelis favor statehood for Palestine and a giving back of the territorires. So why merely site a minority view to make a case to support one's position?
8. Simple test: let both sides cease shooting at each other, get to peace table and hammer out an accord. If one or the other does not make a good faith effort and abide by the terms, or walks away from the table because not getting enough, then we will know where proper blame can be placed. Fair enough, no?
9. Both sides have been cruel, filled with hate, and intransigent. But there is a viable Leftist oppostion allowed in Israel. I don't find this in any of the Arab countries. There are extremists on both sides. The notion that a paper ought not write about the refugee camps because someone is not there is overly simplistic: There are reporters who know the camps firsthand. The camps are a symptom of the problem but not a solution or the cause.
10. A high ranking Carter appointee said years ago: Let Saudi Arabia recognize Israeli's right to exist and then we can recognize a Palestinian right to exist as a state too. Let's see then how the Arab League reacts in the upcoming meeting in Syrian occupied Lebanon.
I will no longer post anything about the Israeli/Arab conflict since it seems to cause a bit of upset here.
Peace to all.
posted by Fred at 6:18 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

It's not difficult to get facts and opinions on what is happening in Palestine. It's just that most of the facts and opinions we read in this country are written by those who have never been to Palestine. I would wager quite a bit that the writer of the Wall Street Journal piece below has not spent much time in the refugee camps of Gaza.

I would recommend a book written by someone who has. Amira Hass is an Israeli journalist writing for Ha'aretz. In 1993 she was assigned to cover Gaza as the Oslo Peace Accords were being implemented. She took the radical step of actually moving to Gaza to live. She rented an apartment in Gaza City and lived with the Palestinians that are feared and despised by most Israelis.

Drinking the Sea at Gaza : Days and Nights In A Land Under Siege is the book of those experiences. You will find that the situation in Gaza is a bit more multi-faceted than the Wall Street Journal, or the current Israeli government, will admit. This book is a must read.

Other sources for what is happening in Israel/Palestine: indymedia israel, the left-wing paper Ha'aretz, right leaning papers The Jerusalem Post and israel insider. The extreme right papers are all in Hebrew. These are all Israeli sources.

I generally don't quote Palestinian sources because too many will discount them simply because they are Palestinian. You won't find many Palestinian sources supporting Israel. (However, you will find many Israeli sources supporting the Palestinians.) An excellent place to start for Palestinian sources is The Electronic Intifada.

This is a very complex situation. Know all you can.

posted by Gordon at 12:30 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Friday, March 15, 2002. *
Fred, while there may be more than one side to any political discussion, you are being disingenuous --to say the least--to trot out this troll before presenting yet another link in support of Israel's latest atrocities (which you do not mention and are too numerous for me to mention here, now). If by predictable, you mean a source of information least likely to be spoiled by mass propaganda machines, then by Zeus, I wouldn't mind being so predictable . . . A symptom of being "spoiled" by aforementioned progit engines would be the naive swallowing and subsequent regurgitation of certain oft-trod myths--here's an example: the myth that Palestinians SEND their children out to the dangerous intersections of Jews and Arabs dotting these deadly zones. This is a myth, Fred. I cannot tell you how many first hand accounts I have read or listened to which portray worried Palestinian parents locking their children in the house to prevent just that. While I have the utmost of respect for you Fred, and your beliefs, I also believe that in the case of the Israeli-Palestinian issue you have become nothing more than a tautological intercom for the Israeli killing regime. I have been particularly incensed over the actions of Israel as of late, and was more than pleasantly surprised to see the U.S., of all people, sponsor a bill in support of a Palestinian state. Meanwhile, over at the Samizdat, you, Fred, seem to be not only ignorant of the latest extrajudicial executions, supranational excursions, and additional cold-blooded murders conducted by the official state of Israel on Palestinian men, women and children (and Red Cross ambulance drivers) in a manner seemingly pell mell here, there, and everywhere--but you doggedly continue to plug anti-Palestinian views in a way which would make FOX News proud. If you really believe in looking at more than one side to a political discussion, Fred, I suggest you start with yourself.
posted by Dr. Menlo at 4:33 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

There is, as usual, more than one side to any political discussion. Even so dedicated a left-wing writer as the highly honored Israeli revisionist historian Benny Morris--the Arab web sites sell his books on line--has changed his position since the suicide bombings began and steadily mounted in Israel. Thus-- horror of horrors-- this right of center American paper recently published a piece LINK which presents an argument contrary to the ones often posted here and at other sites.

I offer this so that our outstanding and very young new site does not become overly predictable, as is the case with Znet, Counterpunch, The Weekly Standard, Commentary and others, where like good parishoners, we go weekly to reaffirm our membership in the various Texts of Holy Writ that we have accepted as The One True Faith while (alas) all others --non-believers--wander in the Darkness of False Belief, having their own Bibles and Faith that strike us as plain silly, meaningless, and empty of The True Way--the one we affirm and know to be Right, though located to the Left.

posted by Fred at 11:54 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

There is a fiction that the Israeli right-wing, including Sharon, sees the inevitability of a Palestinian state. Nothing could be further from the truth. There are deep divisions in Israeli society. Divisions deep enough to cause fear, in Israel, of an Israeli civil war should the settlements ever have to be evacuated. Remember, the Israeli Prime Minister, Rabin, that sought peace was assassinated by an Israeli settler. Two articles from the left-wing Israeli paper Ha'aretz...

With a mighty hand
Sharon's intoxicating policy of force has been encouraging the brutal dreams of the right and its power to extort

"I don't agree," said Sarbaro angrily. "This is our land. The solution is in the nation's ability not to leave even one of them here. Transfer or extermination, it's all the same to me. Anyone who wants to accept our rule and ownership, without civil rights and without ownership of land, can stay. Whoever doesn't will be eliminated. Even if we kill them all, the hostile population will give birth to new terrorists. I'm no racist. In the Jewish people there are many races, but I absolutely hate anyone who hates the Jewish people. I don't believe that they will agree to live under our rule. They see themselves as occupied and no people will agree to live under occupation over time, so we have to get rid of them, to wipe them out."[more]

Our self-appointed settler warlords

The truth is, this only looks like a dispute between hawks and doves over relations with the Palestinians. Actually, the settlers have their own special agenda - a nice, solid one that conflicts with the agenda of most Israeli citizens. Over the years, however, they have managed to hide its true essence behind a veil of defense concerns or nostalgic-Zionist inertia.

Only occasionally does the truth slip out, via an unplanned shout at a rally ("The people of Israel don't want peace!") or the careless remark of a settler ("The real dispute is over the character of the state. We've never had any intention of being a nation like all others.

"Secular Zionism has got it all wrong. We're going to build a Temple on the Temple Mount, and the mosque will be torn down," a settler told Ha'aretz correspondent Daniel Ben Simon in September 2001). [more]
posted by Gordon at 10:20 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Portrait of José Guadalupe Posada with his son S.D.. "...During the Revolution war of 1910, and until his death in 1913, the artist worked restless in the press for the working class. His political stamps are considered today, a chronicle of the social and political events of his time." José Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913). The life and works of José Guadalupe Posada at Arts and History - a virtual forum of Mexican culture.
posted by Andrew at 7:24 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

A class-action lawsuit was filed in district court in Washington, D.C., today alleging that Iraq, "in whole or in part," planned and financed the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City nearly seven years ago.

"Plaintiffs assert that the entire plot was, in whole or in part, orchestrated, assisted technically and/or financially, and directly aided by agents of the Republic of Iraq," said the suit, filed by public interest law firm Judicial Watch. [more]
posted by Fred at 5:04 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

WHEN DID ATHENS become Sparta? When did America redefine itself so profoundly around war?

Events of this winter had already prompted the question, but then over the weekend The Los Angeles Times published the stunning news of the Pentagon's Nuclear Posture Review. Reversing a longtime trend away from nuclear dependence, our government is projecting a US military strategy based on usable nukes, with unprecedented potential for first use against nonnuclear states, for development of new nuclear weapons, and even for a resumption of nuclear testing. This is a move from Mutual Assured Destruction, as The New York Times put it, to Unilateral Assured Destruction - our enemy's. Washington has invited Dr. Strangelove back.

How did this happen? [more]

posted by Fred at 2:57 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

With no medicine and little food, detainees are slowly dying: 3,000 forgotten Taliban prisoners.
posted by Fred at 2:46 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Thursday, March 14, 2002. *
Vice Guide to American Foreign Policy
Anthony Lappé


One of the quickest ways to end a get dirty looks in America these days, I've found, is to point out certain historical truths. The other night, for instance, I made the mistake of pointing out to a group of fellow New Yorkers engulfed in a rehash of 9-11 experiences the irony that the number of WTC victims is almost exactly the same number of Panamanian civilians human rights experts estimate where killed by American forces in our 1989 "arrest" of Manual Noriega. "Huh?" The conversation screeched to a halt. People still don't like to hear that kind of relativism. Six months after the worst attack on American soil, we are still wearing blinders to our own legacy of death and destruction. As I look out on the two beams of light remembering America's innocents lost, I thought I'd republish a short list I wrote up for our friends at Vice magazine:.....
posted by Mark at 5:54 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

DOJ's Dot-Narc Rave Strategy
"The NDIC said five types of people should be targeted, including previous drug offenders, legalization advocates, anarchists and people promoting 'an expanded freedom of expression' that pushes the boundaries of the First Amendment."

Does this explain the six hundred and thirty-six hits from the U.S. Government for this domain in the last 8 days alone?

posted by Dr. Menlo at 5:29 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

you learn something new every day...
certainly simpler to accomplish when you start out as ignorant a fool as yourstruly...
Nuclear Posture Review [Excerpts], from Global Security.org;
we heard it thru the grapevine
posted by j at 4:55 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

On December 4, 2001, Enron filed for bankruptcy. Not long ago Enron was the largest energy trader in the world, the largest natural gas pipeline owner in the country and a pioneering force behind energy deregulation. Employees and investors were stunned. How could one of the most wealthy and powerful corporations in the world go bust over night? Enron links
posted by Fred at 4:14 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Enron is about money. The Tobacco industry is about money and health. And this is what has been taking place since the tobacco industry was exposed. The money: where some of the money went

smoking & hollywood

the industry and its broken promises

low tar, light cigarettes--the final deception

posted by Fred at 3:39 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Wednesday, March 13, 2002. *
Mike's Book Tour Diary
Police Raid, Shut Down My Booksigning in San Diego

I have visited the most out-of-the-way places in California and, no matter where I go or how right-wing the congressman is that represents their district, all sorts of people are desperate to get inside to be with the thousands of others who want to be part of "United We Stand Against the Thief-in-Chief." Grass Valley, Hayward, San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Ukiah, Arcata, Berkeley, Westwood, East L.A., Koreatown (L.A.) -- I wish all of you could see what I have seen. In every town, at every stop, huge throngs of Americans who are sick and tired of the silence that has been demanded of them, lest they be thought of as "unpatriotic" should they dare to question the actions of George W. Bush and company. That's what this tour is all about. It's time to come out and start acting like Americans again.

And then there was San Diego.[more]
posted by Gordon at 1:10 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

it is our duty as a Liberty Loving primate. . .
to inform all of you visiting that we are on heightened alert:


& you better believe it brothers and sisters...


& just a personal aside (please see fit to minimize my ignorance)
but is there anything even remotely politically attuned in terms of
the independent web in re to civil disobedience, environmental issues,
support & maintenance of alternate news sources going on at SXSW ?
posted by j at 9:22 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Some Uses for Mexican Plaster Burro Ornaments That for Some Reason Are Still in Your Car the Morning After You Capture Them from People's Lawns. "...Stiggs was reading that Winston Churchill painted a mouse on the corner of a Rubens painting in his house, which Stiggs really admired since it coincided with our policy that most paintings in art museums can use a plaster burro on them for extra balance and visuality. A few drops of an advanced type of miracle glue and a good design sense are all you need." From The Utterly Monstrous, Mind-Roasting Summer of O.C. and Stiggs by Tod Carroll and Ted Mann (National Lampoon, Fall '82). Our all-time favourite issue turns 20 this year.
posted by Andrew at 7:44 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

As it turned out, while even most conservative Israelis (including Ariel Sharon) conceded that there would, in the end, be a Palestinian state, the Palestinians had not necessarily altered their own founding myths and intentions. Forget Hamas and Islamic Jihad and their culture of martyrdom and absolute victory. Last year, Faisal Husseini, a decided moderate among Yasir Arafat's leadership ranks, gave an interview not long before he died in which he compared Oslo to a Trojan horse, an intermediate, tactical step leading to the elimination of Israel. He said, "If you are asking me as a Pan-Arab nationalist what are the Palestinian borders according to the higher strategy, I will immediately reply: 'From the river to the sea' "—that is, from the Jordan to the Mediterranean.

[more]
posted by Fred at 4:53 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

If we are not allowed to torutre prisoners in the U.S. for information, we have friends elsewhere who can do it for us. U.S. Behind Secret Transfer of Terror Suspects
posted by Fred at 3:32 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Christina, at elegant hack, has been busy. In addition to her blog on information architecture, Gleanings, she has just put up a new information architecture magazine called boxes and arrows. Web design is more than buttons and Flash. It begins here.

Boxes and Arrows is the definitive source for the complex task of bringing architecture and design to the digital landscape. There are various titles and professions associated with this undertaking—information architecture, information design, interaction design, interface design—but when we looked at the work that we were actually doing, we found a “community of practice” with similarities in outlook and approach that far outweighed our differences.
[more—much more]

Learning from the “Powers of Ten”

Although more than 20 years old, the series of films offers lessons on successful presentation and explorations of layered information. The information problems explored through film, by the Eameses, are really no different than many of the problems facing information architects today. Studying the Eames’ work and their processes may yield effective processes for today’s IA. Using different media and methods in prototyping and modeling of ideas, as well as presenting layers of information in a way that is simple and elegant, the Eameses succeeded in their original goals:

“The sketch should, Eames decided, appeal to a ten-year-old as well as a physicist; it should contain a ‘gut feeling’ about dimensions in time and space as well as a sound theoretical approach to those dimensions.”
[more]
posted by Gordon at 12:17 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Tuesday, March 12, 2002. *
Third former militiaman with links to massacres murdered
A Belgian court has postponed a decision over whether to indict Ariel Sharon, the Israeli Prime Minister, for his role in the massacres – he was held "personally responsible" by an Israeli commission of inquiry – while lawyers for the survivors produce more evidence. But the vital evidence that may lie in the memories of those involved with the killers, who were allied to Israel at the time, is disappearing almost by the week as the death list grows.
posted by A.Q. at 3:35 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

more shenanigans from the current administration:
New threat to salmon habitat
Settlement plan cuts protections in 4 states


color us unsurprised...
posted by j at 10:11 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Making pudding with a bucket... 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05.
posted by Andrew at 8:18 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

"Body Piercing Linked to Risky Behavior in Teens"
In related news, Fear of Piercing Linked to Fundamentalism, Obesity, and Love of Jello . . .
posted by Dr. Menlo at 12:15 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Monday, March 11, 2002. *
"Lunch's career began in the seventies as part of the early seminal no-wave band Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, but her rise to underground infamy came in the eighties, when her music became denoted by various collaborations (Birthday Party, Sonic Youth and Einsturzende Neubauten, to name an extreme few) and she expanded to the fringe of spoken-word poetry, photography, film and video. (She was once even the poster girl for the Whitney Museum of Art's Underground Film Festival.) Long before Henry Rollins took his reading act to the road, Lunch was touring with her personal salon of erotic, extreme and offbeat words/poetry; long before Jello Biafra began his Chomsky-esque tours of anti-populist rants, Lunch was giving her own alternative news reports."

Lydia Lunch: Women We Love

posted by Dr. Menlo at 11:45 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Warehouse Full of Russian Books May Go to Incinerator
Luckily, ATC reported a positive update on this story today: the landlord has given a three week extension, and the Library of Congress will "absorb" the most valuable books while doing their best to find homes for the rest. Thanks to Janet Kagan for the link.
posted by Dr. Menlo at 5:32 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

FRANKENFISH
The folks over at Greenpeace have made a little flash game where you can "mutate" a fish and then email it to your pals. (To better warn people about enviromental pollution) Mindlessly fun for a few minutes...
posted by Kirsten at 12:44 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

the Bush tribe believes in Family Values
unfornately, these values happen to conflict w/the rest of us/ours,
D. Lazarus reminds us the sins of the father have become those of...
well, you likely already know the whole sordid story, it's good to be reminded, though...
posted by j at 12:14 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Alex Jones Show Appearance Transcript
Interview with Gregory Palast

GP: Right. First you open up the capital markets. That is, you sell off your local banks to foreign banks. Then you go to what's called market-based pricing. That's the stuff like in California where everything is free market and you end up with water bills - we can't even imagine selling off water companies in the United States of America. But imagine if a private company like Enron owned your water. So then the prices go through the roof. Then open up your borders to trade - complete free marketeering. And Stiglitz who was the chief economist, remember he was running this system, he was their numbers man and he was saying it was like the opium wars. He said this isn't free trade; this is coercion trade. This is war. They are taking apart economies through this. [more]
posted by Gordon at 11:20 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Now we learn that the Bush gang were not really all Dr. Strangelove types but merely a batch of assholes: ha ha: we were kidding
posted by Fred at 10:47 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

The Legendary Jesus Helguera by Benjamin F. Hernandez. A salute to the famed Mexican calendar painter. "...Several generations of Mexican American families have hung the calendar artwork of Jesus Helguera on the walls of their homes. Some never noticed the signature on the bottom right hand corner. Helguera's art captures both the Christian spiritual and indigenous mystical images of Mexico's cultural past."
posted by Andrew at 7:30 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Sunday, March 10, 2002. *
The lure of conspiracy theories... defines a common bond between Islamic and Western societies.

The psychological motives that underlie paranoia vary, experts say. But they include a distrust of government, a drive to feel important and in the know, the tendency to blame others for misfortune and a need to make sense out of confusing events.

Americans are no strangers to any of these imperatives.
[more] via NY Times, reg reqd.
posted by Fred at 7:17 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Saturday, March 09, 2002. *
WHAT REALLY HAPPENED.COM
The history the government hopes you DON'T learn! ... covering everything from Vincent Foster to Flight 800 to Echelon, to 9/11, this site has all the latest and greatest conspiracy theories and underground information. Updated regularly... there are 2 sides to every story... and then there's whatreallyhappened.com
posted by A.Q. at 10:44 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

posted by Dr. Menlo at 10:31 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

"On February 13, 2002 the Bush Administration quietly announced that John Poindexter, previously convicted for obstructing official inquiries and lying to Congress will now head the Government's newest operation for massive domestic spying, the Information Awareness Office. Poindexter, and his partner Oliver North, got their convictions overturned by an appellate court on the grounds that their testimony before Congress was immunized.

"This new office received scant coverage in the U.S. domestic press, but was highlighted in an article in the U.K.'s Guardian newspaper entltitled, 'No more Mr. Scrupulous Guy: How one of the two brains behind the Iran-Contra scandal this week became one of America's most powerful men.'"

via The Partnership for Civil Justice

See also: the White House Press Briefing Transcripts, courtesy of Medley.

posted by Dr. Menlo at 8:08 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

commentary on the
plan for nuclear arms
The piece of great importance posted Friday by Gordon Coale is seen as even scarier in the commentary made about this Bush plan.
posted by Fred at 6:35 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

There are many on the Left who cite the American "intervention" in Korea as being but one of a long list of imperialistic political and military moves. And though we had a limited number of militry advisors in Korea, the initial attack--crossing the 38th parallel--was begun by Northern Korean forces. The Origins of the Korean War, from Russian archival materials
posted by Fred at 4:27 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Friday, March 08, 2002. *
U.S. Works Up Plan for Using Nuclear Arms

The Bush administration has directed the military to prepare contingency plans to use nuclear weapons against at least seven countries and to build new smaller nuclear weapons for use in certain battlefield situations, according to a classified Pentagon report obtained by the Los Angeles Times.

The secret report, which was provided to Congress on Jan. 8, says the Pentagon needs to be prepared to use nuclear weapons against China, Russia, Iraq, North Korea, Iran, Libya and Syria. It says the weapons could be used in three types of situations: against targets able to withstand nuclear attack; in retaliation for attack with nuclear, biological or chemical weapons; or "in the event of surprising military developments."[more]

"In the event of surprising military developments." That sure covers a lot of bases. It makes me feel safer already.
posted by Gordon at 11:55 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

don't get around the blog world like i used to...
so am often indebted to those out there who provide yummy linky goodness,
like this Ashcroft speech link, from D.C.'s log
posted by j at 9:21 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

I really like the name Eban Hieronymus Johnson. ...Like his paintings and drawings too.
posted by Andrew at 9:40 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

sports
Alarmed at the deteriorating situation, European soccer body UEFA said it had suspended all European competition matches in Israel and switched a March 14 UEFA Cup tie between Hapoel Tel Aviv and AC Milan to a neutral venue.
So Sharon and Peres have contacted Berlusconi so see if Tel Aviv can't be reconsidered.
"Berlusconi - è scritto in un comunicato dell'ufficio del premier israeliano - ha detto sia a Sharon, sia a Peres, che farà tutto il possibile per cambiare la decisione e consentire al Milan di andare in Israele affinché la partita si svolga come stabilito".
And what Berlusconi wants, Berlusconi gets.
War, Football, and the Israeli Media .
posted by cynthia korzekwa at 7:54 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Thursday, March 07, 2002. *
Atlanta's Al-Amin Trial
Former Black Panther formerly known as H. Rap Brown on trial for murder in Atlanta. His lawyers call the case a government conspiracy, while the government says physical evidence links Al-Amin to the crime. Updated regularly.
posted by A.Q. at 5:00 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

posted by Jim at 1:49 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Democracy implies as a necessary condition that our opinions are worthwhile, and liberty similarly demands adults to receive it and exercise it knowingly and moderately. But there is no way to train children up to democracy than through choice, or to liberty except through letting loose the restraints. A child who is never called upon to dress himself will not know how to do so as a man. "The best way," Harry Truman said, "to find out if you can trust a man, is to trust him." It is not only the best way to find out; you can train people to be trustworthy by placing confidence in them. Trust is a marvellous irrigant; it makes even barren lands bloom. Milton described the self reliance, the trust of others, which is the root of freedom of speech: "Read any books whatever come to thy hands, for thou art sufficient both to judge aright, and to examine each matter.... Prove all things, hold fast that which is good...."free speech rule book
posted by Fred at 8:18 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Fort Marion Artists. Works by Kiowa men imprisoned at Fort Marion in the 1870s. "...At the conclusion of the Southern Plains Indian war, a group of 72 warriors, primarily Kiowas, Cheyennes, and Arapahoes, were taken prisoner and transported to Fort Marion, in St. Augustine, Florida, where they were held as hostages to ensure the peaceful conduct of their tribes." From Kiowa Drawings in the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian.
posted by Andrew at 8:17 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

At town hall meetings across the state this week, Vermonters were asked to endorse the global environmental strategy known as the Earth Charter, which describes our planet as a place of "injustice, poverty, ignorance and violent conflict," and urges a halt to "environmental devastation" and "the depletion of resources." [full story ]
posted by Fred at 2:24 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Wednesday, March 06, 2002. *
as if this kind of thing wasn't already obvious to some of us
from the Washington Post:Study Ties Pollution, Risk of Lung Cancer
posted by j at 4:50 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Dominic Vincenzo... Released by Death (toilet paper, acrylics). "...Released by Death is stamped on an inmate's final papers when the prison sends out his dead body. This old con secured his own release by overdosing on drugs. He goes out, at ease, listening to music on his walkman." From Cellblock Visions: Prison Art in America. "... inmate artwork, created behind bars, from county jail to death row."
posted by Andrew at 7:30 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Tuesday, March 05, 2002. *

"Why have elections?"

I'm sure George Bush would agree.

posted by Dr. Menlo at 10:51 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

yesssss, sometimes it is true...
we're a little slow on the uptake occasionally,
so, this effort is new to me & just in case, maybe you too?
The War in Context
posted by j at 9:58 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Is it a coincidence that Enron died when the Taliban did?
Enron Pipedreams Buried in Afghanistan
Ron Callari

"The cover-ups are still very much a mystery. It is doubtful that anyone will ever know how many documents were fed into the shredder before and after the corporation declared bankruptcy, or what those documents said. It is also difficult to surmise what the White House is fighting so hard to keep secret, even going to the length of redefining executive privilege and inviting the first Congressional lawsuit ever filed against a president. Given that Enron's influence on Dick Cheney's energy plan is already fairly well-established -- seven out Ken Lay's eight energy policy recommendations were adopted by the Vice President -- it's hard to imagine what else might be so damaging.

The Big Secret might, however, be that the highest levels of the Bush Administration knew during the summer of 2001 that the largest bankruptcy in history was imminent? Or it might be that Enron and the White House were working closely with the Taliban only weeks before the Sept. 11 attack. Was a deal in Afghanistan part of a desperate last-ditch "end run" to bail out Enron? Here's a tip for Congressional investigators and federal prosecutors: Start by looking at the India deal. Closely."
posted by Mark at 5:47 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

An article by Islamist Dr. Rif'at Sayyid Ahmad, titled "Guantanamo, the Auschwitz of the American era: J'accuse!!" recently appeared in the Lebanese daily Al-Liwa. The article described the detention of the Al-Qaida and Taliban members at Guantanamo as a war crime. Following are excerpts from the article:



Guantanamo Bay: 'The American Auschwitz'
[more]
posted by Fred at 2:31 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Why Zionism Is Racism
I believe that zionism is racism, because it fails to admit the reality that the minority indigenous Jewish community in Palestine, that lived there for the last two thousand years, was an undistinguishable people from its Christian and Muslim Palestinian brethren, and that the leader of the Jewish community of the Jewish quarter of Old Jerusalem, Rabbi Lamram Blau, stood on the side of his Palestinian brothers and sisters being exiled in 1948.

I believe that zionism is racism because in modern times, the promise of liberal democracy and justice is a double-edged sword, preached by the Western powers, yet only paid lip-service to in the case of Israel, where Palestinian are continuously expelled, ethnically cleansed, and subjugated, and in the cases where they are assimilated, they are granted, limited, if any, civil rights.
posted by A.Q. at 1:56 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Why Economists Should Study Biology
Ask a random sample of economists what dopamine is, or the meaning of Hamilton's Rule, and I expect most wouldn't know. Neither would they likely be familiar with sexual selection, haplodiploidy, pleiotropy, or the Trivers-Willard hypothesis.

In some ways, this is a blessing. By ignoring dopamine, a neurotransmitter linked to the brain chemistry of pleasure, economists have followed a tradition of avoiding the deeper questions connected with human happiness, in order to concentrate on more manageable problems...There is no scientific way to compare the utility level of different individuals.
Found at killyourtv
posted by riley dog at 1:08 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Hard and/or Deeply Buried Targets (HDBTs): Bombs for Tunnels
The Thermobaric [TB] Weapon Demonstration will develop a weapon concept that is based on a new class of solid fuel-air explosive thermobarics. The term "thermobaric" is derived from the effects of temperature (the Greek word "therme" means "heat") and pressure (the Greek word "baros" means "pressure") on the target. The weapon could be used against a certain type of tunnel targets for a maximum functional kill of the tunnels.
A functional kill can be as permanent as a "structural kill"

posted by riley dog at 1:05 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

A view from the Israeli Left:

Occupation Vs. Democracy

If Israel wants to be a democracy, there are just two options. On the one hand, if the territories are temporarily occupied, then Israel has to retreat, evacuate the settlements, and let the Palestinians establish a contiguous sovereign state, free of any Israeli presence. One must note, though, that Israel has been using the concept of "temporary occupation" and at the same time doing all it can to make this "temporariness" permanent. If, on the other hand, the territories are not just temporarily occupied, Israel must give full citizenship and equal political rights to all their Palestinian inhabitants. Any other "compromise" – especially the present situation of shutting the Palestinians in enclaves surrounded by de facto annexed Israeli territories – deprives Israel of its claim to be a democracy and turn it into one of the darkest regimes that survived into the 21th century..
[more]

There is a third option beyond occupation or democracy, an option that the Israeli Right prefers. It's called transfer.

Israel's Demographic and Security Challenge
Is Transfer the Only Rational Answer?

1. Israel extends its full sovereignty to all of Eretz Yisrael [Palestine] from the Jordan to the Mediterranean Sea, from Golan to Eilat.
2. All Arabs living in Israel receive full civil rights but no political rights in the State of Israel. Civil rights include municipal affairs but no sovereignty on any part of Eretz Yisrael [Palestine].
3. All Arabs unhappy with this arrangement will transferred to a destination of their choice or one of Israel's choosing.
4. The IDF, police, and Jewish civilians are permitted to shoot to kill any Arab attacking them in any way including: stones, Molotov cocktails, knives, guns, etc.
7. Money will be raised abroad and in Israel to finance the transfer of Arabs as a National goal. Economic incentives will be given to Arabs to leave Israel. (...)


Once Israel has been made safe for all time as a Jewish country, we can cultivate the finer aspects of democracy, if we so choose.
[more]
posted by Gordon at 12:03 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Barbara Boxer takes a bite out of Enron Execs
We need more of this kind of righteous anger & indignation
Why is it the only elected officials w/balls are usually the women?
posted by j at 7:15 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

So... Who rules? Why... Ken, of course! Keeping Ken. "...a site exclusively for Ken, the man behind the doll."
posted by Andrew at 6:03 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

posted by Fred at 3:28 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

A different approach to a settlement in the Middle East. Based on the fact that Jordan once possessed the contentious West Bank, that Jordan has sufficient military to keep the peace, and that 50% of the Palestinians in the region now live within the present borders of Jordan: give the West Bank (back) to Jordan
posted by Fred at 3:27 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Monday, March 04, 2002. *
Since it appears that we will be sending troops into Georgia, it might be useful to start looking at what Bush is getting us into.

Where Europe Vanishes
by Robert Kaplan

Civilizations have collided in the Caucasus Mountains since the dawn of history, and the region's dozens of ethnic groups have been noted for "obstinacy and ferocity" since ancient times. Stalin was born in these mountains, and it was also here that the Soviet empire began to crumble. The story of the Republic of Georgia illustrates that the peoples of the Caucasus may prove as incapable of self-rule as they were resistant to rule by outsiders
[more]
posted by Gordon at 7:29 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

What the World Needs Now is another superpower. According to Telepolis, it's Europe. Also: more reasons to be scared about GMOs.
posted by Brad Larcen at 4:39 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

yeeeessh, wottagrimmundey it was...
thankful to the fine mind @ environy for cheering us up
by pointing us to Political Strikes
posted by j at 4:16 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment


First and Last Emperors, by the brilliant Brian Massumi and Kenneth Dean:
The Reagan presidency reintroduced the body of the leader as an effective mechanism in US politics. With it resurfaced reminders of a despotic past, attitudes and images that would seem more at home in ancient China or Rome, or in the France of Louis XIV, than in late-capitalist America. For all his archaism, Reagan worked. And to a surprising extent, he worked through the vehicle of his body. It will be maintained that he is still at work, even after his practical withdrawal from the political scene; and that he will continue to be at work, even after his belated death. United States policy under Bush has followed the political course set by Reagan blow by blow, Panama for Grenada, Saddam Hussein for Khomeini. Bush staged an even more crowd-pleasing Middle East hostage drama than his mentor had, escalating from threats to open war as he merrily set about trying to bomb his way to the mother of all reelections, in bloody one-upsmanship over the behind-the-scenes negotiations with Iran that had crowned Reagan's first term inauguration.
posted by Brad Larcen at 3:46 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Edward Said on America (from Al-Ahram Weekly).
posted by Brad Larcen at 3:40 PM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment

Why should all this Samizdatry be limited to the web? For those with the inclination to speak directly with their neighborhoods:

Micropower Radio - A Technical Primer

Curiously enough, there are even licenses to be had (don't let that get in the way of a good idea though).

Thanks for the invite!
posted by cris at 6:48 AM
0 Comments:
Post a Comment





Site Meter



Creative Commons License